Financial Library

Long-Term Care Solutions

Long-Term Care Solutions

There is a common misconception that, if left unaddressed, can having a devastating effect an individual’s long-term financial well-being. It is the belief that long-term care costs are fully covered by provincial health care plans if you or a loved one ever need this special type of care.

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Unfortunately, this is simply not the case. While programs do exist to cover some needs like these, most of the burden of long-term care costs usually fall to the individual or their family members.

Remember Me!

With spring just around the corner, many Canadians have young people in their lives who are graduating from university, professional schools or community colleges. When the excitement of Commencement wears off, they are faced with the challenge of finding their first full-time paid jobs.

Your Most Valuable Asset

What is your most valuable asset? Many people will think about this question and come up with a variety of answers, but most people will likely say their home is their most valuable asset, while others may say a business they own or a retirement portfolio.

But for some people, understanding the answer to this question comes too late. Without warning, bad health can take its toll which can leave you disabled or severely ill and unable to continue with your everyday responsibilities.

Avoiding Family Conflicts After a Death

No one likes to think about their own mortality, but making a proper estate plan can help to lessen the grief of loved ones left behind. Alternately, without a written estate plan, surviving family members are often saddled with the responsibility of making estate decisions without a clear understanding of the deceased’s wishes.

Fulfilling Your Wishes

With many Baby Boomers now moving into their sunset years, the growing concern is how they will efficiently and effectively plan for the transfer of their wealth to the next generation?

A recent survey by RBC Wealth Management estimated that the amount of money changing hands over the next twenty years is about $400 billion. Yet, only 22 per cent of wealthy Canadians have a detailed Estate Plan on how they plan to pass on their assets according to this survey.*

It Doesn't Pay to Procrastinate

Many people have no idea. Some people have a vague idea. A few people, a very few, have it all worked out. When it comes to retirement planning, many people do not take action until forced to by a mid-life event (career change, death of loved one) or by hearing about seniors running out of money.

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